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SF Pollution Liability: The Value and Risks of Coal Mining

SF Pollution Liability: The Value and Risks of Coal Mining

SF Pollution Liability: The Value and Risks of Coal Mining

Although the usage of coal for electricity has gone down in recent years, coal mining still remains a valuable industry in the energy sector. Despite rising concerns about global warming in the U.S., large coal companies maintain that coal-fired power can be environmentally sustainable, and beneficial to the energy practices of Americans.

Still though, coal mining comes with risks; with the environmental impact of the coal industry affecting land use, waste management, water, and air pollution. Atmospheric pollution is not the only type of pollution that raises concern; coal burning produces many solid waste products annually. These products include fly ash, bottom ash, flue-gas desulfurization sludge that contains mercury, among other chemicals, and more.

According to environmental advocates, such as the writers for DeSmogBlog.com, research has found that a typical-sized coal-burning electricity plant in the U.S. puts out approximately 3.7 million tons of carbon dioxide, 10,000 tons of sulfur dioxide, 10,200 tons of nitrogen oxide, and more, per year. These sources say that a standard 500 megawatt coal-fired electrical plant burns about 1,430,000 tons of coal, uses 2.2 billion gallons of water, and uses 146,000 tons of limestone each year as well.

Needless to say, owning and operating a coal mining company or any other type of energy production company comes with inherent risks. At DiNicola Insurance Services, we understand these risks; which is why we offer a comprehensive San Francisco Pollution Liability Program for business in the energy sector, as well as other various industries. Please contact us today for more information at (855) 247-1912.

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